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ㆍ 제목 National incidence of medication error in surgical patients before and after Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour reform
ㆍ 조회수 2715 ㆍ 등록일시 2015-07-09
ㆍ 첨부파일

National incidence of medication error in surgical patients before and after Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education duty-hour reform


 2015 Jun 15. pii: S1931-7204(15)00144-0. doi: 10.1016/j.jsurg.2015.05.013. [Epub ahead of print]

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) established duty-hour regulations for accredited residency programs on July 1, 2003. It is unclear what changes occurred in the national incidence of medication errors in surgical patients before and after ACGME regulations.

DESIGN:

Patient and hospital characteristics for pre- and post-duty-hour reform were evaluated, comparing teaching and nonteaching hospitals. A difference-in-differences study design was used to assess the association between duty-hour reform and medication errors in teaching hospitals.

SETTING:

We used the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database, which consists of approximately annual 20% stratified sample of all the United States nonfederal hospital inpatient admissions.

PARTICIPANTS:

A query of the database, including 4 years before (2000-2003) and 8 years after (2003-2011) the ACGME duty-hour reform of July 2003, was performed to extract surgical inpatient hospitalizations (N = 13,933,326). The years 2003 and 2004 were discarded in the analysis to allow for a wash-out period during duty-hour reform (though we still provide medication error rates).

RESULTS:

The Nationwide Inpatient Sample estimated the total national surgical inpatients (N = 135,092,013) in nonfederal hospitals during these time periods with 68,736,863 patients in teaching hospitals and 66,355,150 in nonteaching hospitals. Shortly after duty-hour reform (2004 and 2006), teaching hospitals had a statistically significant increase in rate of medication error (p = 0.019 and 0.006, respectively) when compared with nonteaching hospitals even after accounting for trends across all hospitals during this period. After 2007, no further statistically significant difference was noted.

CONCLUSIONS:

After ACGME duty-hour reform, medication error rates increased in teaching hospitals, which diminished over time. This decrease in errors may be related to changes in training program structure to accommodate duty-hour reform.


http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26089160

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